Increasing incidence and mortality of primary intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma in the United States

@article{Patel2001IncreasingIA,
  title={Increasing incidence and mortality of primary intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma in the United States},
  author={Tushar Patel},
  journal={Hepatology},
  year={2001},
  volume={33}
}
  • T. Patel
  • Published 1 June 2001
  • Medicine
  • Hepatology
Clinical observations suggest a recent increase in intrahepatic biliary tract malignancies. Thus, our aim was to determine recent trends in the epidemiology of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma in the United States. Reported data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program and the United States Vital Statistics databases were analyzed to determine the incidence, mortality, and survival rates of primary intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Between 1973 and 1997, the incidence… 

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