Increases in human plasma antioxidant capacity after consumption of controlled diets high in fruit and vegetables.

@article{Cao1998IncreasesIH,
  title={Increases in human plasma antioxidant capacity after consumption of controlled diets high in fruit and vegetables.},
  author={Guohuan Cao and Sarah L Booth and James A. Sadowski and Ronald L. Prior},
  journal={The American journal of clinical nutrition},
  year={1998},
  volume={68 5},
  pages={
          1081-7
        }
}
  • G. Cao, S. Booth, R. Prior
  • Published 1 November 1998
  • Medicine
  • The American journal of clinical nutrition
BACKGROUND The putative beneficial effects of an increased consumption of fruit and vegetables have been associated with antioxidant nutrients. However, the effect of fruit and vegetable consumption on the overall antioxidant status in humans is unclear. OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to investigate whether a diet rich in fruit and vegetables would affect the antioxidant capacity of human plasma. DESIGN Thirty-six healthy nonsmokers resided in a metabolic research unit and… 

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