Increased vitamin A in esophagus and other extrahepatic tissues after chronic ethanol consumption in the rat.

@article{Leo1986IncreasedVA,
  title={Increased vitamin A in esophagus and other extrahepatic tissues after chronic ethanol consumption in the rat.},
  author={Maria Anna Leo and C. I. Kim and Charles S. Lieber},
  journal={Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research},
  year={1986},
  volume={10 5},
  pages={
          487-92
        }
}
In rats fed ethanol (36% of total energy) for 1 month, vitamin A content of the esophageal mucosa was found to be increased 5-fold, compared to animals pair-fed an isocaloric control diet containing the same amount of vitamin A. Similar results were observed with diets of either lower vitamin A content or zinc supplementation. Significant increases of retinoids were also found in lungs, trachea, kidneys, and testes, but not in the eyes. These increases in extrahepatic tissues contrasted… 
Effects of ethanol and carbon tetrachloride upon vitamin A status of rats.
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CCl4 (with phenobarbitol), which is a more potent hepatotoxin as evidenced by a more elevated cytochrome P450 and distorted liver morphology, not only reduced liver vitamin A, but also increased serum vitamin A.
Chlormethiazole treatment prevents reduced hepatic vitamin A levels in ethanol-fed rats.
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It is suggested that chlormethiazole can restore both hepatic retinol and retinyl ester concentrations to normal levels in ethanol-fed rats through blocking enhanced both degradation of vitamin A and mobilization of Vitamin A from the liver into the circulation.
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The Effect of Maternal Ethanol Ingestion on Fetal Vitamin A in the Rat
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The ingestion of ethanol by pregnant rats is associated with a reduction in fetal liver vitamin A levels and an elevation in the levels of lung and kidney vitamin A, indicating possible altered vitamin A metabolism as a result of ethanol consumption.
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It was concluded that low-dose ATRA treatment could restore retinoids concentrations and abolish the PRM formation in liver of ALD rats, and then ameliorate the injury of liver cells.
Low-dose ATRA supplementation abolishes PRM formation in rat liver and ameliorates ethanol-induced liver injury
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  • Medicine, Biology
    Journal of Huazhong University of Science and Technology. Medical sciences = Hua zhong ke ji da xue xue bao. Yi xue Ying De wen ban = Huazhong keji daxue xuebao. Yixue Yingdewen ban
  • 2006
TLDR
It was concluded that low-dose ATRA treatment could restore retinoids concentrations and abolish the PRM formation in liver of ALD rats, and then ameliorate the injury of liver cells.
Hepatic, metabolic and toxic effects of ethanol: 1991 update.
  • C. Lieber
  • Medicine, Biology
    Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research
  • 1991
Until two decades ago, dietary deficiencies were considered to be the only reason for alcoholics to develop liver disease. As the overall nutrition of the population improved, more emphasis was
Centrilobular distribution of acetaldehyde and collagen in the ethanol‐fed micropig
TLDR
Histological and immunofluorescent studies provide in vivo evidence that perivenous collagen deposition is linked to ethanol metabolism and acetaldehyde production, and produced the features of alcoholic liver disease concurrent with hepatic deficiency of selected nutrients.
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TLDR
It is concluded that chronic ethanol consumption decreases hepatic vitamin A, and that some mechanisms other than malnutrition and malabsorption may be involved in this process.
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TLDR
An acute dose of ethanol increases serum vitamin A and decreases hepatic vitamin A, most likely because of increased release from the liver or decreased uptake by the liver of retinyl esters as part of the lipoproteins.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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