Increased dietary and circulating lycopene are associated with reduced prostate cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis

@article{Rowles2017IncreasedDA,
  title={Increased dietary and circulating lycopene are associated with reduced prostate cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis},
  author={Joe L Rowles and Katherine M Ranard and Joseph Wayne Smith and Ran An and John W Erdman},
  journal={Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases},
  year={2017},
  volume={20},
  pages={361-377}
}
Background:Prostate cancer (PCa) is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Many epidemiological studies have investigated the association between prostate cancer and lycopene, however, results have been inconsistent. This study aims to determine the impact of dietary and circulating concentrations of lycopene on PCa risk and to investigate potential dose-response associations.Methods:We conducted a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis for the for the… Expand
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It is demonstrated that higher lycopene consumption/circulating concentration is associated with a lower risk of PCa and if there are other factors in tomato products that might potentially decrease PCa risk and progression. Expand
Effect of Carotene and Lycopene on the Risk of Prostate Cancer: A Systematic Review and Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies
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The results lend some support to the hypothesis that prostate cancers that harbor TMPRSS2:ERG may be etiologically distinct from fusion-negative cancers, and in particular, tomato sauce consumption may play a role in reducing TMPR SS 2:ERG-positive disease. Expand
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