Increased breathing control: Another factor in the evolution of human language

@article{MacLarnon2004IncreasedBC,
  title={Increased breathing control: Another factor in the evolution of human language},
  author={Ann MacLarnon and Gwen Hewitt},
  journal={Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues},
  year={2004},
  volume={13}
}
Investigation into the evolution of human language has involved evidence of many different kinds and approaches from many different disciplines. For full modern language, humans must have evolved a range of physical abilities for the production of our complex speech sounds, as well as sophisticated cognitive abilities. Human speech involves free‐flowing, intricately varied, rapid sound sequences suitable for the fast transfer of complex, highly flexible communication. Some aspects of human… 

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