Increased amygdala response to masked emotional faces in depressed subjects resolves with antidepressant treatment: an fMRI study

@article{Sheline2001IncreasedAR,
  title={Increased amygdala response to masked emotional faces in depressed subjects resolves with antidepressant treatment: an fMRI study},
  author={Yvette I. Sheline and Deanna M. Barch and Julie M. Donnelly and John M. Ollinger and Abraham Z. Snyder and Mark A. Mintun},
  journal={Biological Psychiatry},
  year={2001},
  volume={50},
  pages={651-658}
}
BACKGROUND The amygdala has a central role in processing emotions, particularly fear. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) amygdala activation has been demonstrated outside of conscious awareness using masked emotional faces. METHODS We applied the masked faces paradigm to patients with major depression (n = 11) and matched control subjects (n = 11) during fMRI to compare amygdala activation in response to masked emotional faces before and after antidepressant treatment. Data… 
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Amygdala hyperactivity is a neural substrate of negatively biased automatic emotion processing that could be a determinant for a more severe disease course.
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Functional brain activation to emotional and nonemotional faces in healthy children: Evidence for developmentally undifferentiated amygdala function during the school-age period
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Task-irrelevant fear enhances amygdala-FFG inhibition and decreases subsequent face processing.
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The amygdala may be sensitive to task-irrelevant fearful crowds and subsequently strengthen its inhibitory influence on face-responsive fusiform N170 generators, providing spatiotemporal evidence for a feedback mechanism of the amygdala by narrowing attention in order to focus on potential threats.
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