Increased Resolution of Y Chromosome Haplogroup T Defines Relationships among Populations of the Near East, Europe, and Africa

@inproceedings{Mendez2011IncreasedRO,
  title={Increased Resolution of Y Chromosome Haplogroup T Defines Relationships among Populations of the Near East, Europe, and Africa},
  author={Fernando Luis Mendez and Tatiana Karafet and Thomas Krahn and Harry Ostrer and Himla Soodyall and Michael F. Hammer},
  booktitle={Human Biology: The Official Publication of the American Association of Anthropological Genetics},
  year={2011}
}
Abstract Increasing phylogenetic resolution of the Y chromosome haplogroup tree has led to finer temporal and spatial resolution for studies of human migration. [] Key Result Estimates of the timing of the branching events within haplogroup T, along with a comprehensive geographic survey of the major T subclades, suggest that this haplogroup began to diversify in the Near East ∼25 kya.

Improved phylogenetic resolution and rapid diversification of Y-chromosome haplogroup K-M526 in Southeast Asia

Genotype 13 new highly informative single-nucleotide polymorphisms are genotype 13 in a worldwide sample of 4413 males that carry the derived allele at M526, and an NRY haplogroup tree is reconstructed with significantly higher resolution for the major clade within haplogroups K, K-M526.

A calibrated human Y-chromosomal phylogeny based on resequencing.

A nearly 10-fold increase in the number of Y markers with phylogenetic information, and novel historical insights derived from placing them on a calibrated phylogenetic tree are provided.

Paternal lineages in southern Iberia provide time frames for gene flow from mainland Europe and the Mediterranean world

The particular Andalusian R1b-M269 assemblage confirms the shallow topology of the clade, and the sharing of lineages with the rest of Europe indicates the impact in Iberia of an amount of pre-existing diversity, with the possible exception of R 1b-DF27.

resequencing A calibrated human Y-chromosomal phylogeny based on

A nearly 10-fold increase in the number of Y markers with phylogenetic information, and novel historical insights derived from placing them on a calibrated phylogenetic tree are provided.

Genetic structure and sex‐biased gene flow in the history of southern African populations

The study shows that the population history of southern Africa has been complex, with different immigrating groups mixing to different degrees with the autochthonous populations, and a significant increase in the intensity of the sex‐biased gene flow from north to south may reflect changes in the social dynamics between Khoisan and Bantu groups over time.

Genetic structure and sex-biased gene flow in the history of southern African populations

The Bantu expansion had a notable genetic impact in southern Africa, and it is confirmed that in this region it was probably a rapid, male-dominated expansion, and a significant increase in the intensity of sex-biased gene flow from north to south is found.

Carriers of Mitochondrial DNA Macrohaplogroup N Lineages Reached Australia around 50,000 Years Ago following a Northern Asian Route

Apart from a single migration event via a southern route, phylogeny and phylogeography of N(xR) lineages support that people carrying mtDNA N lineages could have reach Australia following a northern route through Asia.

The genetic variation in the R1a clade among the Ashkenazi Levites’ Y chromosome

Approximately 300,000 men around the globe self-identify as Ashkenazi Levites, of whom two thirds were previously shown to descend from a single male. The paucity of whole Y-chromosome sequences
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 33 REFERENCES

New binary polymorphisms reshape and increase resolution of the human Y chromosomal haplogroup tree.

Major changes in the topology of the parsimony tree are described and names for new and rearranged lineages within the tree following the rules presented by the Y Chromosome Consortium in 2002 are provided.

Excavating Y-chromosome haplotype strata in Anatolia

This comprehensive characterization of Y-chromosome heritage addresses many multifaceted aspects of Anatolian prehistory, including: the most frequent haplogroup, J, splits into two sub-clades, one of which (J2) shows decreasing variances with increasing latitude, compatible with a northward expansion.

Thomas Jefferson's Y chromosome belongs to a rare European lineage.

The Y chromosome carried by President Thomas Jefferson is characterized and shows that it is most closely related to an Egyptian K2 haplotype, but the presence of scattered and diverse European haplotypes within the network is nonetheless consistent with Jefferson's patrilineage belonging to an ancient and rare indigenous European type.

Extended Y chromosome haplotypes resolve multiple and unique lineages of the Jewish priesthood

The hypothesis of a common origin of the CMH in the Near East well before the dispersion of the Jewish people into separate communities is supported and indicates that the majority of contemporary Jewish priests descend from a limited number of paternal lineages.

A nomenclature system for the tree of human Y-chromosomal binary haplogroups.

A simple set of rules was developed to unambiguously label the different clades nested within a single most parsimonious phylogeny, which supersedes and unifies past nomenclatures and allows the inclusion of additional mutations and haplogroups yet to be discovered.

Polarity and temporality of high-resolution y-chromosome distributions in India identify both indigenous and exogenous expansions and reveal minor genetic influence of Central Asian pastoralists.

The reappraisal indicates that pre-Holocene and Holocene-era--not Indo-European--expansions have shaped the distinctive South Asian Y-chromosome landscape.

Contrasting patterns of Y chromosome variation in Ashkenazi Jewish and host non-Jewish European populations

It is striking that whereas Ashkenazi populations are genetically more diverse at both the SNP and STR level compared with their European non-Jewish counterparts, they have greatly reduced within-haplogroup STR variability, especially in those founder haplogroups that migrated from the Near East.

High mutation rates have driven extensive structural polymorphism among human Y chromosomes

High mutation rates have driven extensive structural polymorphism among human Y chromosomes and limited variation in the copy number of Y-linked genes is found, which raises the possibility of selective constraints.

Y chromosome diversity, human expansion, drift, and cultural evolution

It is suggested that cultural evolution has been subrogating biologic evolution in providing natural selection advantages and reducing the authors' dependence on genetic mutations, especially in the last phase of transition from food collection to food production.

Phylogeographic analysis of paternal lineages in NE Portuguese Jewish communities.

The genetic composition of the Portuguese Jewish communities from Trás-os-Montes is examined, with a high-resolution Y-chromosome typing strategy, to clarify how these communities avoided the expected inbreeding caused by over four centuries of religious repression.