Increased Peripheral Insulin Sensitivity and Muscle Mitochondrial Enzymes but Unchanged Blood Glucose Control in Type I Diabetics After Physical Training

@article{Wallberghenriksson1982IncreasedPI,
  title={Increased Peripheral Insulin Sensitivity and Muscle Mitochondrial Enzymes but Unchanged Blood Glucose Control in Type I Diabetics After Physical Training},
  author={H. Wallberg-henriksson and R. Gunnarsson and J. Henriksson and R. DeFronzo and P. Felig and J. {\"O}stman and J. Wahren},
  journal={Diabetes},
  year={1982},
  volume={31},
  pages={1044 - 1050}
}
Nine male, insulin-dependent diabetic patients participated in a 16-wk training program consisting of 1 h of jogging, running, ball games, and gymnastics, performed 2-3 times/wk. The training resulted in an 8% increase of maximal oxygen uptake (P < 0.01). Insulin sensitivity as determined by the insulin clamp technique increased 20% (P < 0.05). Glycosylated hemoglobin showed no change (10.4 ± 0.7% versus 11.3 ± 0.5%), 24-h urinary glucose excretion was not reduced, and home-monitored urine… Expand
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