Increased Breast Cancer Risk among Women Who Work Predominantly at Night

@article{Hansen2001IncreasedBC,
  title={Increased Breast Cancer Risk among Women Who Work Predominantly at Night},
  author={Johnni Hansen},
  journal={Epidemiology},
  year={2001},
  volume={12},
  pages={74-77}
}
  • J. Hansen
  • Published 1 January 2001
  • Medicine
  • Epidemiology
Irregular working hours, including working at night, have serious psychological and physiological effects. In a nationwide population-based case-control study, we investigated the breast cancer risk among 30- to 54-year-old Danish women who worked predominantly at night. Individual employment histories were reconstructed back to 1964 for each of 7035 women with breast cancer and their individually matched controls from the records of a nationwide pension scheme with compulsory membership. Odds… 
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Evidence is provided that indicators of exposure to light at night may be associated with the risk of developing breast cancer.
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