Increase of a Caribbean leatherback turtle Dermochelys coriacea nesting population linked to long-term nest protection

@article{Dutton2005IncreaseOA,
  title={Increase of a Caribbean leatherback turtle Dermochelys coriacea nesting population linked to long-term nest protection},
  author={Donna L. Dutton and P. Dutton and M. Chaloupka and R. Boulon},
  journal={Biological Conservation},
  year={2005},
  volume={126},
  pages={186-194}
}
The leatherback turtle Dermochelys coriacea is considered to be at serious risk of global extinction, despite ongoing conservation efforts. Intensive long-term monitoring of a leatherback nesting population on Sandy Point (St. Croix, US Virgin Islands) offers a unique opportunity to quantify basic population parameters and evaluate effectiveness of nesting beach conservation practices. We report a significant increase in the number of females nesting annually from ca. 18-30 in the 1980s to 186… Expand
Nesting ecology and population trend of leatherback turtles Dermochelys coriacea at Pacuare Nature Reserve, Costa Rica
Abstract The leatherback turtle Dermochelys coriacea, the only extant species in its family, is categorized as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List. The protection of nesting beaches and the associatedExpand
Reassessment of the Leatherback Turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) Nesting Population at Parque Nacional Marino Las Baulas, Costa Rica: Effects of Conservation Efforts
TLDR
The number of leatherback turtles nesting at Parque Marino Las Baulas declined precipitously in the 15 years that it was monitored, and mortality rates for juveniles and subadults in the ocean appear to be double those of a stable population. Expand
ESTABLISHMENT AND GROWTH OF A SEA TURTLE ROOKERY: THE POPULATION BIOLOGY OF THE LEATHERBACK IN FLORIDA
TLDR
A baseline of biological data is established for the leatherback at the northern limit of its nesting range in the northwestern Atlantic (Florida) to inform management and contribute to further increases of leatherbacks in the Atlantic as well as contributing genetic variation, thereby achieving objectives of the US Recovery Plan. Expand
A long-term decline in the abundance of endangered leatherback turtles, Dermochelys coriacea, at a foraging ground in the California Current Ecosystem
Abstract Pacific leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) are critically endangered, and declines have been documented at multiple nesting sites throughout the Pacific. The western PacificExpand
Increased nesting, good survival and variable site fidelity for leatherback turtles in Florida, USA
Abstract Despite facing serious threats of extinction in the Eastern Pacific, the leatherback turtle ( Dermochelys coriacea ) appears to be thriving in the Atlantic basin based on increasing nestExpand
High and variable mortality of leatherback turtles reveal possible anthropogenic impacts.
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Data on individually marked turtles that nest at Playa Grande, Costa Rica, are used to address whether climatic variability affects survival and inter-breeding interval and contrast hypotheses on the role of climatic covariates on reproductive frequency. Expand
Thirty years of leatherback turtle Dermochelys coriacea nesting in Espírito Santo, Brazil, 1988-2017: reproductive biology and conservation
TLDR
An increasing, although variable, trend in the annual number of nests was observed and there was also a significant decrease in the mean curved carapace length of the population, which it is hypothesized was caused by recruitment of new females to the nesting population. Expand
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The leatherbacks nesting at Bird's Head Peninsula, Papua Barat, Indonesia, account for 75% of the total leatherback nesting in the western Pacific and represent the last sizeable nesting populationExpand
Growth of captive leatherback turtles, Dermochelys coriacea, with inferences on growth in the wild: Implications for population decline and recovery
TLDR
Information obtained from turtles incidentally captured in fisheries, supplemented with growth curve data, indicates that leatherbacks are vulnerable to entanglement or hooking in various pelagic gear types, such as drift gill nets and longline within 3 years from nest emergence. Expand
Survival and breeding interval of an endangered marine vertebrate, the leatherback turtle Dermochelys coriacea, in French Guiana
  • D Chevallier, M. Girondot, +5 authors JD Lebreton
  • Biology
  • 2020
TLDR
Analysis of data from the long-term monitoring program of leatherbacks in French Guiana provides a sound structure for broader and richer analyses to extract biological information from marked individuals and offers an invaluable source of demographic information on leatherbacks, a species for which only a small segment of the population is accessible to intermittent sampling. Expand
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