Incorporating societal concerns for fairness in numerical valuations of health programmes.

@article{Nord1999IncorporatingSC,
  title={Incorporating societal concerns for fairness in numerical valuations of health programmes.},
  author={Erik Nord and Jos{\'e} Lu{\'i}s Pinto and Jeff Richardson and Paul T. Menzel and Peter A Ubel},
  journal={Health economics},
  year={1999},
  volume={8 1},
  pages={
          25-39
        }
}
The paper addresses some limitations of the QALY approach and outlines a valuation procedure that may overcome these limitations. In particular, we focus on the following issues: the distinction between assessing individual utility and assessing societal value of health care; the need to incorporate concerns for severity of illness as an independent factor in a numerical model of societal valuations of health outcomes; similarly, the need to incorporate reluctance to discriminate against… 

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