Incomplete neutralization in African American English: The case of final consonant voicing

@article{Farrington2018IncompleteNI,
  title={Incomplete neutralization in African American English: The case of final consonant voicing},
  author={Charlie Farrington},
  journal={Language Variation and Change},
  year={2018},
  volume={30},
  pages={361 - 383}
}
Abstract In many varieties of African American English (AAE), glottal stop replacement and deletion of word-final /t/ and /d/ results in consonant neutralization, while the underlying voicing distinction may be maintained by other cues, such as vowel duration. Here, I examine the relationship between vowel duration, final glottal stop replacement, and deletion of word-final /t, d/ to determine whether the phonological contrast of consonant voicing is maintained through duration of the preceding… Expand
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