Incidence of non-melanocytic skin cancer treated in Australia

@article{Giles1988IncidenceON,
  title={Incidence of non-melanocytic skin cancer treated in Australia},
  author={Graham G. Giles and Robin Marks and Peter Foley},
  journal={British Medical Journal (Clinical research ed.)},
  year={1988},
  volume={296},
  pages={13 - 17}
}
In 1985, as part of a national random household omnibus survey by a market research company, 30 976 Australians (mostly of European origin) were asked whether they had ever been treated by a doctor for skin cancer. The treating doctor or hospital was then approached for confirmation of the diagnosis of all those people who claimed to have been so treated within the past 12 months. Demographic data were also collected, permitting analysis by age, sex, country of birth, current residence, and… 
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