Incidence of hypo- and hypercarbia in severe traumatic brain injury before and after 2003 pediatric guidelines*

@article{Curry2008IncidenceOH,
  title={Incidence of hypo- and hypercarbia in severe traumatic brain injury before and after 2003 pediatric guidelines*},
  author={Rebecca Lee Curry and William Hollingworth and Richard G. Ellenbogen and Monica S. Vavilala},
  journal={Pediatric Critical Care Medicine},
  year={2008},
  volume={9},
  pages={141-146}
}
Objective: To examine the incidence of severe hypocarbia (Paco2 <30 mm Hg) in patients with severe pediatric traumatic brain injury before and after publication of the 2003 pediatric guidelines (PG). Design: Retrospective cohort analysis. Setting: Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, Washington (January 1, 1995, to December 31, 2005). Patients: Children <15 yrs of age with severe pediatric traumatic brain injury. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: The pre-PG group (before August… 
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