Incidence and risk factors for subcutaneous immunotherapy anaphylaxis: the optimization of safety

@article{Caminati2015IncidenceAR,
  title={Incidence and risk factors for subcutaneous immunotherapy anaphylaxis: the optimization of safety},
  author={Marco Caminati and Annarita Dama and Ivana Djuric and Marcello Montagni and Michele Schiappoli and Erminia Ridolo and Gianenrico Senna and Giorgio Walter Canonica},
  journal={Expert Review of Clinical Immunology},
  year={2015},
  volume={11},
  pages={233 - 245}
}
Fatal reactions related to subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy are rare: one event in 2.5 million injections has been reported in the USA and none in Europe. The prevalence of very severe systemic reactions (systemic adverse events [SAEs]) is one in 1 million injections. Though the serious events rate is decreasing and the majority of SAEs (∼0.2% per injection) are moderate and reversible, they still represent a major concern. Uncontrolled asthma, long-term therapy with β-blockers and high… Expand
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