Incidence, Persistence, and Progression of Tinnitus Symptoms in Older Adults: The Blue Mountains Hearing Study

@article{Gopinath2010IncidencePA,
  title={Incidence, Persistence, and Progression of Tinnitus Symptoms in Older Adults: The Blue Mountains Hearing Study},
  author={Bamini Gopinath and Catherine M. McMahon and Elena Rochtchina and Michael J. Karpa and Paul Mitchell},
  journal={Ear and Hearing},
  year={2010},
  volume={31},
  pages={407-412}
}
Objective: Temporal population-based data on tinnitus are lacking. We used a representative older population-based cohort to establish 5-yr incidence, persistence, and progression of tinnitus symptoms. Design: Two thousand six participants of the Blue Mountains Hearing Study (1997-1999) had complete tinnitus data, and of these, 1214 participants were followed up at 5-yr examinations in 2002-2004. Presence of prolonged tinnitus was assessed by a positive response to a single question… 
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