Incest uncovered at the elite prehistoric Newgrange monument in Ireland

@article{Sheridan2020IncestUA,
  title={Incest uncovered at the elite prehistoric Newgrange monument in Ireland},
  author={Alison Sheridan},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2020},
  volume={582},
  pages={347-349}
}
The huge, elaborate, 5,000-year-old tomb at Newgrange, Ireland, is thought to have been built for a powerful elite. DNA of a man buried there reveals a case of incest. Was this a strategy to maintain a dynastic bloodline? DNA analysis reveals the surprising parentage of a man buried at Newgrange. 

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