Inappropriate interpretation of surface EMG signals and muscle fiber characteristics impedes understanding of the control of neuromuscular function.

@article{Enoka2015InappropriateIO,
  title={Inappropriate interpretation of surface EMG signals and muscle fiber characteristics impedes understanding of the control of neuromuscular function.},
  author={Roger M. Enoka and Jacques Duchateau},
  journal={Journal of applied physiology},
  year={2015},
  volume={119 12},
  pages={
          1516-8
        }
}
as the final common pathway from the nervous system to muscle, the motor unit transmits an activation signal generated by the nervous system to engage the contractile proteins and produce the muscle forces needed for reflex responses, automatic behaviors, and voluntary actions ([11][1]). The net 

Commentaries on Viewpoint: Inappropriate interpretation of surface EMG signals and muscle fiber characteristics impedes understanding of the control of neuromuscular function.

to the editor: Enoka and Duchateau ([2][1]) correctly call for caution when interpreting voluntary surface electromyography (sEMG) in terms of neural drive. If voluntary sEMG signals recorded during

Associations between motor unit action potential parameters and surface EMG features.

The results fully clarify the potential and limitation of the surface EMG to provide estimates of the neural drive to muscles and indicate that, conversely, the average conduction velocity could provide relevant information on these strategies.

Physiological validation of the decomposition of surface EMG signals.

  • R. Enoka
  • Biology
    Journal of electromyography and kinesiology : official journal of the International Society of Electrophysiological Kinesiology
  • 2019

Properties of the motor unit action potential shape in proximal and distal muscles of the upper limb in healthy and post-stroke individuals

  • L. M. McphersonF. Negro D. Farina
  • Psychology
    2016 38th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC)
  • 2016
A method to examine characteristics of a motor unit (MU) population more reliably by assessing the distributions of frequency content and amplitude for a collection of individual MUAPs, identified using high-density sEMG decomposition is presented.

Tutorial_ Analysis of motor unit discharge characteristics from high-density surface EMG signals

Recent work demonstrated that it is possible to identify motor unit discharge times from high-density surface EMG (HDEMG) decomposition. Since then, the number of studies that use HDEMG decomposition

Neuromechanical Control of Ballistic Contractions Decoding Motor Unit Activity from High Density EMG

An investigation validates the adoption of automatic methods for estimation of ballistic motor output onset, and provides evidence of the accuracy of the signal decomposition with respect to the reference invasive assessment of motor neurons, bringing a new insight into how recruitment and excitation influence mechanical performance.

Tutorial: Analysis of motor unit discharge characteristics from high-density surface EMG signals.

The loss of muscle force production after muscle stretching is not accompanied by altered corticospinal excitability

Impaired neural drive contributed to the stretch-induced force loss; however, changes in corticospinal excitability and intracortical inhibition could not explain the phenomenon.

Rate Coding and the Control of Muscle Force.

This review provides five examples of how the modulation of rate coding influences the force exerted by muscle during voluntary actions.

Differences in myoelectric manifestations of fatigue during isometric muscle actions.

The use of fatigue indices, based on sEMG amplitude, as an objective indicator of the efficacy of an endurance training programme for sportsmen requires further research.
...

References

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Commentaries on Viewpoint: Inappropriate interpretation of surface EMG signals and muscle fiber characteristics impedes understanding of the control of neuromuscular function.

to the editor: Enoka and Duchateau ([2][1]) correctly call for caution when interpreting voluntary surface electromyography (sEMG) in terms of neural drive. If voluntary sEMG signals recorded during

Interpretation of the Surface Electromyogram in Dynamic Contractions

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  • Geology
    Exercise and sport sciences reviews
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This review focuses on methods for extracting information from the surface EMG recorded in dynamic contractions, and concludes that interpretation of thesurface EMG in dynamic tasks requires caution.

The contractile properties of human motor units during voluntary isometric contractions

1. The electrical activity of single motor units has been recorded from the first dorsal interosseus muscle of normal human subjects during voluntary, isometric contractions, together with the force

Control scheme governing concurrently active human motor units during voluntary contractions

The electrical activity of up to eight concurrently active motor units has been recorded from the human deltoid and first dorsal interosseous muscles and these signals have been decomposed into their constituent motor‐unit action potential trains using a recently developed technique.

The extraction of neural strategies from the surface EMG: an update.

The current review extends the discussion to EMG-based coherence methods for assessing neural connectivity to focus first on EMG amplitude cancellation, which intrinsically limits the association between EMg amplitude and the intensity of the neural activation, and then on the limitations of coherence Methods.

Decoding the neural drive to muscles from the surface electromyogram

Relationships between surface-detected EMG signals and motor unit activation.

Mean absolute S-EMG amplitude at different force levels and its changes during the course of a submaximal contraction are dependent on the number of motor units active, their size, and firing rates.

Adjustments differ among low-threshold motor units during intermittent, isometric contractions.

The results indicate that low-threshold motor units exhibit individual adjustments in muscle fiber conduction velocity and motor neuron activation that depended on the relative duration of activity during intermittent contractions.

Physiological types and histochemical profiles in motor units of the cat gastrocnemius

Intracellular stimulation of individual motoneurones ensured functional isolation of the muscle units innervated by them in pentobarbitone‐anaesthetized cats.

Motor unit physiology: Some unresolved issues

The purpose of this review was to examine three issues that limit our understanding of motor unit physiology: (1) the range and distribution of the innervation ratios in a muscle; (2) the association