Inactivation of Enveloped Viruses in Human Bodily Fluids by Purified Lipids a

@article{Isaacs1994InactivationOE,
  title={Inactivation of Enveloped Viruses in Human Bodily Fluids by Purified Lipids a},
  author={Charles E. Isaacs and Kwang Kims and Halld{\'o}r Thormar},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={1994},
  volume={724}
}
Antimicrobial lipids are found in mucosal secretions and are one of a number of nonimmunologic and nonspecific protective factors found at mucosal surfaces. Lipids can inactivate enveloped viruses, bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. Lipid-dependent antimicrobial activity at mucosal surfaces is due to certain monoglycerides and fatty acids that are released from triglycerides by lipolytic activity. Medium chain length antiviral lipids can be added to human blood products that contain HIV-1 and HIV-2… Expand
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