Inactivation dates of the human and guinea pig vitamin C genes

@article{Lachapelle2010InactivationDO,
  title={Inactivation dates of the human and guinea pig vitamin C genes},
  author={M. Lachapelle and G. Drouin},
  journal={Genetica},
  year={2010},
  volume={139},
  pages={199-207}
}
The capacity to biosynthesize ascorbic acid has been lost in a number of species including primates, guinea pigs, teleost fishes, bats, and birds. This inability results from mutations in the GLO gene coding for L-gulono-γ-lactone oxidase, the enzyme responsible for catalyzing the last step in the vitamin C biosynthetic pathway. We analyzed available primate and rodent GLO gene sequences to determine their evolutionary history. We used a method based on sequence comparisons of lineages with and… Expand
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