In vivo nanomechanical imaging of blood-vessel tissues directly in living mammals using atomic force microscopy

@article{Mao2009InVN,
  title={In vivo nanomechanical imaging of blood-vessel tissues directly in living mammals using atomic force microscopy},
  author={Youdong Mao and Quan-mei Sun and Xiufeng Wang and Q. Ouyang and Lizhong Han and Lei Jiang and Dong Han},
  journal={Applied Physics Letters},
  year={2009},
  volume={95},
  pages={013704}
}
Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is difficult to achieve in living mammals but is necessary for understanding mechanical properties of tissues in their native form in organisms. Here we report in vivo nanomechanical imaging of blood-vessel tissues directly in living mammalians by AFM combined with surgical operations. Nanomechanical heterogeneity of blood vessels is observed across the diverse microenvironments of the same tissues in vivo. This method is further used to measure the counteractive… Expand
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