Corpus ID: 6268843

In vitro cultivation of a Babesia sp. from cattle in South Africa.

@article{Zweygarth1995InVC,
  title={In vitro cultivation of a Babesia sp. from cattle in South Africa.},
  author={Erich Zweygarth and Caitlin Jade van Niekerk and M. C. Just and D. T. de Waal},
  journal={The Onderstepoort journal of veterinary research},
  year={1995},
  volume={62 2},
  pages={
          139-42
        }
}
A South African Babesia sp. of cattle which is as yet unclassified, was continuously cultivated in micro-aerophilous stationary-phase culture. The parasites were resuscitated from a blood stabilate stored in liquid nitrogen. A modified HL-1 medium supplemented with either horse or bovine serum was used. Cultures were initiated in a humidified atmosphere containing 2% O2, 5% CO2 and 93% N2 at 37 degrees C. Parasites were detected on Giemsa-stained smears after 2 d in culture. On day 4, the… Expand
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