In vitro and in vivo interactions between Erwinia amylovora and related saprophytic bacteria.

Abstract

Under carefully controlled laboratory conditions, a highly virulent strain of Erwinia amylovora coinhabited susceptible host tissues with a yellow saprophytic bacterium, which was invariably isolated from fire blight infected trees, with or without producing symptoms of the disease depending on the status of a number of environmental factors, both climatic and physiological. In particular, variation of temperature and sucrose concentration determined, independently, the equilibrium of a readily reversible alternation of predominance of the two bacteria. It is suggested that E. amylovora may sometimes exist as an avirulent resident on the surface or within healthy host plants when environmental conditions favor growth of the yellow saprophyte rather than the pathogen. Such conditions, which are more likely to be obtained in midsummer and the fall, include temperature fall or rise below or above the optimum for E. amylovora, decreased humidity or diminution of sap flow, and increased sugar content in the host tissues.

Cite this paper

@article{Erskine1975InVA, title={In vitro and in vivo interactions between Erwinia amylovora and related saprophytic bacteria.}, author={Jamie M Erskine and L E Lopatecki}, journal={Canadian journal of microbiology}, year={1975}, volume={21 1}, pages={35-41} }