In vitro and in vivo generation and characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm–dispersed cells via c-di-GMP manipulation

@article{Chua2015InVA,
  title={In vitro and in vivo generation and characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm–dispersed cells via c-di-GMP manipulation},
  author={Song Lin Chua and L. D. Hultqvist and Mingjun Yuan and Morten Theil Rybtke and Thomas E. Nielsen and Michael Givskov and Tim Tolker-Nielsen and Liang Yang},
  journal={Nature Protocols},
  year={2015},
  volume={10},
  pages={1165-1180}
}
Bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a global secondary bacterial messenger that controls the formation of drug-resistant multicellular biofilms. Lowering the intracellular c-di-GMP content can disperse biofilms, and it is proposed as a biofilm eradication strategy. However, freshly dispersed biofilm cells exhibit a physiology distinct from biofilm and planktonic cells, and they might have a clinically relevant role in infections. Here we present in vitro and in vivo… 
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