In rats fed high-energy diets, taste, rather than fat content, is the key factor increasing food intake: a comparison of a cafeteria and a lipid-supplemented standard diet

@inproceedings{Oliva2017InRF,
  title={In rats fed high-energy diets, taste, rather than fat content, is the key factor increasing food intake: a comparison of a cafeteria and a lipid-supplemented standard diet},
  author={Laia Morera Oliva and T{\`a}nia Aranda and Giada Caviola and Anna Fern{\'a}ndez-Bernal and M. Beyra Alema{\~n}y and Jos{\'e} Antonio Fern{\'a}ndez-L{\'o}pez and Xavier Remesar},
  booktitle={PeerJ},
  year={2017}
}
BACKGROUND Food selection and ingestion both in humans and rodents, often is a critical factor in determining excess energy intake and its related disorders. METHODS Two different concepts of high-fat diets were tested for their obesogenic effects in rats; in both cases, lipids constituted about 40% of their energy intake. The main difference with controls fed standard lab chow, was, precisely, the lipid content. Cafeteria diets (K) were self-selected diets devised to be desirable to the rats… CONTINUE READING
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