In Their Own Words: Explaining Obedience to Authority Through an Examination of Participants' Comments

@article{Burger2011InTO,
  title={In Their Own Words: Explaining Obedience to Authority Through an Examination of Participants' Comments},
  author={Jerry M. Burger and Zackary M. Girgis and C Manning},
  journal={Social Psychological and Personality Science},
  year={2011},
  volume={2},
  pages={460 - 466}
}
The authors examined data generated during a replication of Milgram’s obedience studies to address some lingering questions about those studies. In Study 1, judges coded comments participants made during experimental and debriefing sessions. Participants who refused to follow the experimenter’s instructions were significantly more likely to express a sense of personal responsibility than those who followed the instructions. Participants who expressed concern for the well-being of the learner… 

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