Improving urban African Americans' blood pressure control through multi-level interventions in the Achieving Blood Pressure Control Together (ACT) study: a randomized clinical trial.

@article{Ephraim2014ImprovingUA,
  title={Improving urban African Americans' blood pressure control through multi-level interventions in the Achieving Blood Pressure Control Together (ACT) study: a randomized clinical trial.},
  author={Patti L. Ephraim and Felicia Hill-Briggs and Debra L. Roter and Lee R. Bone and Jennifer L. Wolff and LaPricia Lewis-Boyer and David M. Levine and Hanan J. Aboumatar and Lisa A Cooper and Stephanie J Fitzpatrick and Kimberly A Gudzune and Michael C. Albert and Dwyan Monroe and Michelle K. Simmons and Debra L. Hickman and Leon Purnell and Annette R Fisher and Richard Matens and Gary J Noronha and Peter Fagan and Hema Codathi Ramamurthi and Jessica M. Ameling and Jeanne Charlston and Tanyka Suzanne Sam and Kathryn Anne Carson and Nae-Yuh Wang and Deidra C. Crews and Raquel C. Greer and Valerie Sneed and Sarah Justine Flynn and Nicole DePasquale and L. Ebony Boulware},
  journal={Contemporary clinical trials},
  year={2014},
  volume={38 2},
  pages={
          370-82
        }
}
BACKGROUND Given their high rates of uncontrolled blood pressure, urban African Americans comprise a particularly vulnerable subgroup of persons with hypertension. Substantial evidence has demonstrated the important role of family and community support in improving patients' management of a variety of chronic illnesses. However, studies of multi-level interventions designed specifically to improve urban African American patients' blood pressure self-management by simultaneously leveraging… CONTINUE READING
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