Improving urban African Americans' blood pressure control through multi-level interventions in the Achieving Blood Pressure Control Together (ACT) study: a randomized clinical trial.

@article{Ephraim2014ImprovingUA,
  title={Improving urban African Americans' blood pressure control through multi-level interventions in the Achieving Blood Pressure Control Together (ACT) study: a randomized clinical trial.},
  author={Patti L. Ephraim and Felicia Hill-Briggs and Debra L. Roter and Lee R. Bone and Jennifer L. Wolff and LaPricia Lewis-Boyer and David M. Levine and Hanan J. Aboumatar and Lisa A Cooper and Stephanie Fitzpatrick and Kimberly A Gudzune and Michael C. Albert and Dwyan Monroe and Michelle Simmons and Debra L. Hickman and Leon Purnell and Annette R Fisher and Richard Matens and Gary J. Noronha and Peter Fagan and Hema Codathi Ramamurthi and Jessica M. Ameling and Jeanne Charlston and Tanyka Suzanne Sam and Kathryn A. Carson and Nae-Yuh Wang and Deidra C. Crews and Raquel C. Greer and Valerie Sneed and Sarah J. Flynn and Nicole DePasquale and L. Ebony Boulware},
  journal={Contemporary clinical trials},
  year={2014},
  volume={38 2},
  pages={
          370-82
        }
}
BACKGROUND Given their high rates of uncontrolled blood pressure, urban African Americans comprise a particularly vulnerable subgroup of persons with hypertension. Substantial evidence has demonstrated the important role of family and community support in improving patients' management of a variety of chronic illnesses. However, studies of multi-level interventions designed specifically to improve urban African American patients' blood pressure self-management by simultaneously leveraging… CONTINUE READING
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