Improving command selection with CommandMaps

@article{Scarr2012ImprovingCS,
  title={Improving command selection with CommandMaps},
  author={Joey Scarr and Andy Cockburn and Carl Gutwin and Andrea Bunt},
  journal={Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems},
  year={2012}
}
Designers of GUI applications typically arrange commands in hierarchical structures, such as menus, due to screen space limitations. However, hierarchical organisations are known to slow down expert users. This paper proposes the use of spatial memory in combination with hierarchy flattening as a means of improving GUI performance. We demonstrate these concepts through the design of a command selection interface, called CommandMaps, and analyse its theoretical performance characteristics. We… 

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