Improving Communication Skills-A Randomized Controlled Behaviorally Oriented Intervention Study for Residents in Internal Medicine

@article{Langewitz1998ImprovingCS,
  title={Improving Communication Skills-A Randomized Controlled Behaviorally Oriented Intervention Study for Residents in Internal Medicine},
  author={Wolf Axel Langewitz and Philipp Eich and Alexander Kiss and Brigitta Wossmer},
  journal={Psychosomatic Medicine},
  year={1998},
  volume={60},
  pages={268-276}
}
Objective We investigated whether patient-centered communication skills can be taught to residents in Internal Medicine by using a time-limited behaviorally oriented intervention. Method Residents working at the Department of Internal Medicine were randomly assigned to an intervention group (IG; N = 19) or a control group (CG; N = 23). In addition to 6 hours of standard medical education per week, the IG received specific communication training of 22.5 hours duration within a 6-month period… Expand
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