Corpus ID: 83989633

Improvements in nematophagous fungi to control gastro-intestinal parasites : this thesis is presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Veterinary Studies in Veterinary Parasitology, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

@inproceedings{Clarke2004ImprovementsIN,
  title={Improvements in nematophagous fungi to control gastro-intestinal parasites : this thesis is presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Veterinary Studies in Veterinary Parasitology, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand},
  author={S. Clarke},
  year={2004}
}
Gastro-intestinal parasites are a major cause of production loss in New Zealand livestock, and the continuing development of anthelmintic-resistant strains represents a significant threat to the future New Zealand agricultural economy. This has led to an increased interest in alternative (non-chemotherapeutic) controls, including potential application of the nematode-trapping fungi Duddingtonia jlagrans and Arthrobotrys oligospora. These species are capable of reducing the number of free-living… Expand

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