Improved growth and survival of offspring of peacocks with more elaborate trains

@article{Petrie1994ImprovedGA,
  title={Improved growth and survival of offspring of peacocks with more elaborate trains},
  author={Marion Petrie},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1994},
  volume={371},
  pages={598-599}
}
  • M. Petrie
  • Published 1 October 1994
  • Biology
  • Nature
THERE is considerable controversy about what females gain from mate choice in a lekking species in which males provide no obvious resources. Females may gain direct benefits such as safe copula-tions or increased fertility by mating with particular males, or they may gain indirect benefits for their offspring1–3. It is difficult to look for paternal effects on offspring performance because it is hard to control for any differences in the material and genetic contribution provided by the female… 

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References

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It is reported here that by choosing victorious males, females mate with males that are most likely to survive the following six months, which supports a basic assumption of the 'good gene' models.

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