Improved dynamic reachability algorithms for directed graphs

@article{Roditty2002ImprovedDR,
  title={Improved dynamic reachability algorithms for directed graphs},
  author={Liam Roditty and Uri Zwick},
  journal={The 43rd Annual IEEE Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science, 2002. Proceedings.},
  year={2002},
  pages={679-688}
}
  • Liam Roditty, U. Zwick
  • Published 16 November 2002
  • Computer Science
  • The 43rd Annual IEEE Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science, 2002. Proceedings.
We obtain several new dynamic algorithms for maintaining the transitive closure of a directed graph, and several other algorithms for answering reachability queries without explicitly maintaining a transitive closure matrix. Among our algorithms are: (i) a decremental algorithm for maintaining the transitive closure of a directed graph, through an arbitrary sequence of edge deletions, in O(mn) total expected time, essentially the time needed for computing the transitive closure of the initial… 
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