Corpus ID: 877531

Imprisonment and crime Can both be reduced ?

@inproceedings{Durlauf2010ImprisonmentAC,
  title={Imprisonment and crime Can both be reduced ?},
  author={Steven Durlauf and Daniel S. Nagin},
  year={2010}
}
Since 1972, the rate of incarceration in U.S. state and federal prisons has increased every year without exception from a rate of 96 prisoners per 100,000 population in 1972 to 504 prisoners per 100,000 in 2008 (BJS, 2008).1 Counting those housed in jails, the nation’s total incarceration rate has surpassed 750 per 100,000 (Liptak, 2008). Accompanying the 40-year increase in imprisonment has been a companion growth in corrections budgets from $9 billion in 1982 to $69 billion in 2006, which is… Expand
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