Imported crazy ant displaces imported fire ant, reduces and homogenizes grassland ant and arthropod assemblages

@article{LeBrun2013ImportedCA,
  title={Imported crazy ant displaces imported fire ant, reduces and homogenizes grassland ant and arthropod assemblages},
  author={Edward G LeBrun and J. Anthony Abbott and Lawrence E. Gilbert},
  journal={Biological Invasions},
  year={2013},
  volume={15},
  pages={2429-2442}
}
A recently introduced, ecologically dominant, exotic ant species, Nylanderia fulva, is invading the Southeastern United States and Texas. We evaluate how this invader impacts diversity and abundance of co-occurring ants and other arthropods in two grasslands. N. fulva rapidly attains densities up to 2 orders of magnitude greater than the combined abundance of all other ants. Overall ant biomass increases in invaded habitat, indicating that N. fulva exploits resources not fully utilized by the… Expand

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