Importance of Achromatic Contrast in Short-Range Fruit Foraging of Primates

@article{Hiramatsu2008ImportanceOA,
  title={Importance of Achromatic Contrast in Short-Range Fruit Foraging of Primates},
  author={Chihiro Hiramatsu and Amanda D. Melin and Filippo Aureli and Colleen M. Schaffner and Misha Vorobyev and Yoshifumi Matsumoto and Shoji Kawamura},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2008},
  volume={3}
}
Trichromatic primates have a 'red-green' chromatic channel in addition to luminance and 'blue-yellow' channels. It has been argued that the red-green channel evolved in primates as an adaptation for detecting reddish or yellowish objects, such as ripe fruits, against a background of foliage. However, foraging advantages to trichromatic primates remain unverified by behavioral observation of primates in their natural habitats. New World monkeys (platyrrhines) are an excellent model for this… 

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