Corpus ID: 14591983

Implicit memory and early unrepressed unconscious : Their role in the therapeutic process ( How the neurosciences can contribute to psychoanalysis )

@inproceedings{Marta2004ImplicitMA,
  title={Implicit memory and early unrepressed unconscious : Their role in the therapeutic process ( How the neurosciences can contribute to psychoanalysis )},
  author={Śliwa Marta},
  year={2004}
}
The author discusses memory from the point of view of the neurosciences and molecular biology, proposing an integration with the psychoanalytic theory of the unconscious. The discovery of the implicit memory has extended the concept of the unconscious and supports the hypothesis that this is where the emotional and affective—sometimes traumatic—presymbolic and preverbal experiences of the primary mother–infant relations are stored. They could form the ground structure of an early unrepressed… Expand
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