Implicit Memory and the Formation of New Associations in Nondemented Parkinson′s Disease Individuals and Individuals with Senile Dementia of the Alzheimer Type: A Serial Reaction Time (SRT) Investigation

@article{Ferraro1993ImplicitMA,
  title={Implicit Memory and the Formation of New Associations in Nondemented Parkinson′s Disease Individuals and Individuals with Senile Dementia of the Alzheimer Type: A Serial Reaction Time (SRT) Investigation},
  author={F. Richard Ferraro and David A. Balota and Lisa Tabor Connor},
  journal={Brain and Cognition},
  year={1993},
  volume={21},
  pages={163-180}
}
Using the serial reaction time (SRT) task developed by Nissen and Bullemer (1987, Cognitive Psychology, 19, 1-32), implicit memory performance was examined in four groups of subjects: nondemented healthy aged individuals; nondemented Parkinson's disease individuals; very mildly demented senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT) individuals; and mildly demented SDAT individuals. The SRT task involved four blocks of a repeated 10-item keypress sequence that tapped general skill development… 
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