Implications of the lack of accuracy of the lifetime rodent bioassay for predicting human carcinogenicity.

@article{Ennever2003ImplicationsOT,
  title={Implications of the lack of accuracy of the lifetime rodent bioassay for predicting human carcinogenicity.},
  author={Fanny Knox Ennever and Lester B. Lave},
  journal={Regulatory toxicology and pharmacology : RTP},
  year={2003},
  volume={38 1},
  pages={
          52-7
        }
}

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