Implications of early hominid labyrinthine morphology for evolution of human bipedal locomotion

@article{Spoor1994ImplicationsOE,
  title={Implications of early hominid labyrinthine morphology for evolution of human bipedal locomotion},
  author={Fred Spoor and Bernard A. Wood and Frans W. Zonneveld},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1994},
  volume={369},
  pages={645-648}
}
THE upright posture and obligatory bipedalism of modern humans are unique among living primates. The evolutionary history of this behaviour has traditionally been pursued by functional analysis of the postcranial skeleton and the preserved footprint trails of fossil hominids. Here we report a systematic attempt to reconstruct the locomotor behaviour of early hominids by looking at a major component of the mechanism for the unconscious perception of movement, namely by examining the vestibular… 
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