Implications of direct and indirect range restriction for meta-analysis methods and findings.

@article{Hunter2006ImplicationsOD,
  title={Implications of direct and indirect range restriction for meta-analysis methods and findings.},
  author={John Edward Hunter and Frank L. Schmidt and Huy Le},
  journal={The Journal of applied psychology},
  year={2006},
  volume={91 3},
  pages={
          594-612
        }
}
Range restriction in most data sets is indirect, but the meta-analysis methods used to date have applied the correction for direct range restriction to data in which range restriction is indirect. The authors show that this results in substantial undercorrections for the effects of range restriction, and they present meta-analysis methods for making accurate corrections when range restriction is indirect. Applying these methods to a well-known large-sample empirical database, the authors… Expand

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