Implications of a sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) tax when substitutions to non-beverage items are considered.

@article{Finkelstein2013ImplicationsOA,
  title={Implications of a sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) tax when substitutions to non-beverage items are considered.},
  author={Eric Andrew Finkelstein and Chen Zhen and Marcel Bilger and James Nonnemaker and Assad M Farooqui and Jessica E. Todd},
  journal={Journal of health economics},
  year={2013},
  volume={32 1},
  pages={219-39}
}
Using the 2006 Homescan panel, we estimate the changes in energy, fat and sodium purchases resulting from a tax that increases the price of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) by 20% and the effect of such a tax on body weight. In addition to substitutions that may arise with other beverages, we account for substitutions between SSBs and 12 major food categories. Our main findings are that the tax would result in a decrease in store-bought energy of 24.3kcal per day per person, which would… CONTINUE READING
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