Implications of Extracellular Matrix Production by Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells for Development of Wound Healing Therapies

Abstract

The synthesis and deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in the healing of acute and chronic wounds. Consequently, the use of ECM as treatment for chronic wounds has been of special interest-both in terms of inducing ECM production by resident cells and applying ex vivo produced ECM. For these purposes, using adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) could be of use. ASCs are recognized to promote wound healing of otherwise chronic wounds, possibly through the reduction of inflammation, induction of angiogenesis, and promotion of fibroblast and keratinocyte growth. However, little is known regarding the importance of ASC-produced ECM for wound healing. In this review, we describe the importance of ECM for wound healing, and how ECM production by ASCs may be exploited in developing new therapies for the treatment of chronic wounds.

DOI: 10.3390/ijms18061167

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Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Hyldig2017ImplicationsOE, title={Implications of Extracellular Matrix Production by Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells for Development of Wound Healing Therapies}, author={Kathrine Hyldig and Simone Elkj{\ae}r Riis and Cristian Pablo Pennisi and Vladimir Zachar and Trine Fink}, booktitle={International journal of molecular sciences}, year={2017} }