Implementing the patient-centered medical home model for chronic disease care in small medical practices: practice group characteristics and physician understanding.

Abstract

Strengthening primary care may improve health outcomes and restrain spending. The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model is endorsed as a tool to achieve this. Early evaluations in large group practices demonstrate improvements in some health outcomes. Evidence is lacking from small medical practices that deliver the majority of primary health care. This was a national survey of 200 physicians that explored perceptions of PCMH. There was considerable interest in adoption of the model; however, providing PCMH care was seen as an extension of traditional roles that requires additional reimbursement. No differentiation was made among a variety of payment models to do this. All joint principle components of the model were identified as important: extending access and information technology were the most contentious. There was consensus that PCMH might improve the quality of primary care; however, tension between wider societal benefits and rising costs for individual practices was a challenge to implementation.

DOI: 10.1177/1062860612454451

Cite this paper

@article{Baxter2013ImplementingTP, title={Implementing the patient-centered medical home model for chronic disease care in small medical practices: practice group characteristics and physician understanding.}, author={Louisa Baxter and David Nash}, journal={American journal of medical quality : the official journal of the American College of Medical Quality}, year={2013}, volume={28 2}, pages={113-9} }