Imperial Manila: How institutions and political geography disadvantage Philippine provinces

@article{Tusalem2019ImperialMH,
  title={Imperial Manila: How institutions and political geography disadvantage Philippine provinces},
  author={Rollin F. Tusalem},
  journal={Asian Journal of Comparative Politics},
  year={2019},
  volume={5},
  pages={235 - 269}
}
  • Rollin F. Tusalem
  • Published 1 September 2020
  • Political Science
  • Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
Critics of Philippine democracy have pointed out that the unitary system employed since the country became a sovereign state in 1946 led to the prolonged underdevelopment of sub-national regions (provinces). Hence, policy makers have put forward the argument that a shift to a Federal system is necessary because of the imperial Manila syndrome. This is the notion that political, economic, and social underdevelopment is more prevalent the farther away a province is from the capital, Metro-Manila… 

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