Impending extinction crisis of the world’s primates: Why primates matter

@article{Estrada2017ImpendingEC,
  title={Impending extinction crisis of the world’s primates: Why primates matter},
  author={Alejandro Estrada and Paul A. Garber and Anthony B. Rylands and Christian Roos and Eduardo Fern{\'a}ndez-Duque and Anthony Di Fiore and K Anne-Isola Nekaris and Vincent Nijman and Eckhard W. Heymann and Joanna E Lambert and Francesco Rovero and Claudia Barelli and Joanna M Setchell and Thomas R. Gillespie and Russell A. Mittermeier and Luis D. Verde Arregoitia and Miguel de Guinea and Sidney Feitosa Gouveia and Ricardo Dobrovolski and Sam Shanee and Noga Shanee and Sarah A. Boyle and Agust{\'i}n Fuentes and Katherine C MacKinnon and Katherine R. Amato and Andreas L. S. Meyer and Serge A. Wich and Robert Wald Sussman and Ruliang Pan and Inza Kon{\'e} and Baoguo Li},
  journal={Science Advances},
  year={2017},
  volume={3}
}
Impending extinction of the world’s primates due to human activities; immediate global attention is needed to reverse the trend. Nonhuman primates, our closest biological relatives, play important roles in the livelihoods, cultures, and religions of many societies and offer unique insights into human evolution, biology, behavior, and the threat of emerging diseases. They are an essential component of tropical biodiversity, contributing to forest regeneration and ecosystem health. Current… Expand
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