Impartial Institutions, Pathogen Stress and the Expanding Social Network

@article{Hruschka2014ImpartialIP,
  title={Impartial Institutions, Pathogen Stress and the Expanding Social Network},
  author={Daniel J. Hruschka and Charles Efferson and Ting Jiang and Ashlan Falletta-Cowden and Sveinn Sigurdsson and Rita Anne McNamara and Madeline Sands and Shirajum Munira and Edward Slingerland and Joseph Henrich},
  journal={Human Nature},
  year={2014},
  volume={25},
  pages={567-579}
}
Anthropologists have documented substantial cross-society variation in people’s willingness to treat strangers with impartial, universal norms versus favoring members of their local community. Researchers have proposed several adaptive accounts for these differences. One variant of the pathogen stress hypothesis predicts that people will be more likely to favor local in-group members when they are under greater infectious disease threat. The material security hypothesis instead proposes that… Expand
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Culture and social behavior
  • J. Henrich
  • Sociology
  • Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences
  • 2015
Comparative research from diverse societies shows that human social behavior varies immensely across a broad range of domains, including cooperation, fairness, trust, punishment, aggressiveness,Expand
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