Impaired exercise performance in the heat is associated with an anticipatory reduction in skeletal muscle recruitment

@article{Tucker2004ImpairedEP,
  title={Impaired exercise performance in the heat is associated with an anticipatory reduction in skeletal muscle recruitment},
  author={Ross Tucker and Laurie Rauch and Yolande X.R. Harley and Timothy D. Noakes},
  journal={Pfl{\"u}gers Archiv},
  year={2004},
  volume={448},
  pages={422-430}
}
Exercise in the heat causes “central fatigue”, associated with reduced skeletal muscle recruitment during sustained isometric contractions. A similar mechanism may cause fatigue during prolonged dynamic exercise in the heat. The aim of this study was to determine whether centrally regulated skeletal muscle recruitment was altered during dynamic exercise in hot (35°C) compared with cool (15°C) environments. Ten male subjects performed two self-paced, 20-km cycling time-trials, one at 35°C (HOT… CONTINUE READING

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