Impaired disengagement of attention in young children with autism.

@article{Landry2004ImpairedDO,
  title={Impaired disengagement of attention in young children with autism.},
  author={Reginald Landry and Susan E. Bryson},
  journal={Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines},
  year={2004},
  volume={45 6},
  pages={
          1115-22
        }
}
  • R. Landry, S. Bryson
  • Published 1 September 2004
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines
BACKGROUND The present study examined the disengage and shift operations of visual attention in young children with autism. METHODS For this purpose, we used a simple visual orienting task that is thought to engage attention automatically. Once attention was first engaged on a central fixation stimulus, a second stimulus was presented on either side, either simultaneously or successively. Latency to begin an eye movement to the peripheral stimulus served as the main dependent measure. The two… 

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