Impacts of changing ocean chemistry in a high-CO2 world

@article{Turley2008ImpactsOC,
  title={Impacts of changing ocean chemistry in a high-CO2 world},
  author={C. Turley},
  journal={Mineralogical Magazine},
  year={2008},
  volume={72},
  pages={359 - 362}
}
  • C. Turley
  • Published 2008
  • Environmental Science
  • Mineralogical Magazine
Abstract Over the last ∼200 years, since the start of the industrial revolution, the increase in the burning of fossil fuels, cement manufacturing and changes to land use has increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations from ∼280 to 385 ppm. These are the highest levels experienced on Earth for at least the last 800,000 years, possibly for the past 10’s of millions of years. The 2007 IPCC report on climate change predicts a continued rapid rise in atmospheric CO2 leading to significant temperature… Expand
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